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Tuesday, February 14

  1. page home edited ... The report will be released officially on in February 2017 at the ELI Annual Meeting. What's …
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    The report will be released officially on in February 2017 at the ELI Annual Meeting.
    What's New?
    The expert panel has just finished the first round of voting! The interim results have been identified and the final results will be published as soon as they complete the final round of rankings November 7th.report is here! Visit http://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-higher-education-edition.
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Monday, January 16

  1. page Panel of Experts edited ... United States Ruth Nemire AACP American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy United State…
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    AACPAmerican Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
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Thursday, January 12

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    StaffordshireDe Montfort University
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    United States
    Alexandra Pickett
    Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching ExcellenceState University of New York
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Monday, November 14

  1. page Affective Computing edited ... Deep and Machine Learning Deep and Machine Learning is likely to help bring in innovations to…
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    Deep and Machine Learning
    Deep and Machine Learning is likely to help bring in innovations to teaching and learning. Smart Flower recognition system is an example. This reminds me of Genome matching databases etc that has been around for sometime. I feel innovations in technology with deep and machine learning would mean that there can be more novel applications, which allow students to say for instance, take a photo, research on information on that, communicate on that etc. Searches need not be restricted to texts. It could be by pictures, voices. nacha_sockalingam Sep 30, 2016. [Editor's Note: Adding here from RQ2.]
    add your responseMachine Learning This may be a stretch in the 5 year horizon, but a vast amount of work is being done in this field. At CMU, we've been talking with colleagues in our Machine Learning Department (http://www.ml.cmu.edu/) about implications for sophisticated information retrieval and mining technologies. I could imagine a world in which searches are personalized and enhanced, targeting highly relevant material to the individual searcher. cmkeithw Nov 11, 2016 Agree that machine and deep learning tech will have big impact on personalized and pro-active tailoring of information environments, and applications are entering the market quite fast erik.stattin Nov 13, 2016 [Editor's Note: This discussion was added here from RQ2.]
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on higher education?
    Acellerated learning and the recognition by instructors of the role that emotions play in learning, and the ability to act on this knowledge. deone.zell Sep 18, 2016deone.zell
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Tuesday, November 8

  1. page Panel of Experts edited ... UNIR Spain Gardner Campbell Virginia Commonwealth University United States Chun-Yen Cha…
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    United States

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    National Taiwan Normal University
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    The expert panel has just finished the first round of voting! The interim results have been identified and the final results will be published as soon as they complete the final round of rankings November 7th.
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Monday, October 31

  1. page home edited ... The report will be released officially on in February 2017 at the ELI Annual Meeting. What's …
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    The report will be released officially on in February 2017 at the ELI Annual Meeting.
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    The project kicks off formally in July 2016. Meet the expert panel who will selecthas just finished the topics forfirst round of voting! The interim results have been identified and the final results will be published as soon as they complete the report.final round of rankings November 7th.
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  2. page Challenges edited ... Traditional approaches to teaching and learning with roots in the 18th century and earlier are…
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    Traditional approaches to teaching and learning with roots in the 18th century and earlier are still very common in many institutions, and often stifle learning as much as they foster it. As the Internet has brought the ability to learn something about almost anything at the palm of one’s hand, there is an increasing interest in the kinds of self-directed, curiosity-based learning that have long been common in museums, science centers, and personal learning networks. These, along with life experience and other more serendipitous forms of learning fall under the banner of informal learning, and serve to enhance student engagement by encouraging them to follow their own learning pathways and interests. Many experts believe that a blending of formal and informal methods of teaching and learning can create an education environment that fosters experimentation, curiosity, and above all, creativity. In this sense, an overarching goal is to cultivate the pursuit of lifelong learning in all students and educators.However, formally acknowledging and rewarding skills both educators and students master outside of the classroom is compounding this challenge. Key to this challenge is assessment and certification of knowledge and skills. Credit for recognized learning is likely to include new 'micro-credentials' signified by badges and similar awards which become 'stackable credentials' for flexible packaging by learners to represent what they know and can do. Creative partnerships in learning will be required to build the needed bridges between formal and informal learning providers. david.c.gibson Aug 9, 2016 kevin_ashford_rowe Aug 15, 2016jantonio Sep 28, 2016 bsmith Sep 30, 2016 paul.signorelli Oct 5, 2016 This could be a trend rather than a challenge.kumiko.aoki Sep 20, 2016 Surely you also need to consider also teaching both staff and students about digital citizenship to ensure (if you are assessing informal learning somehow) that they have a solid basic knowledge of how to be a responsible digital citizen and how to utilize a digital personal learning network to enhance their learning, this is crucial both in VET and HEd yvette.drager Sep 29, 2016 The growing trend of micro-credentials to complement a more formal education pushes institutions to also introduce in their formal courses other pedagogical approaches based on well defined learning outcomes and competency-based pedagogy. This blending of formal and informal learning has a positive impact on the pedagogical reflection of many institutions.agermain Sep 30, 2016(rneuron Oct 2, 2016)Agree that assessment and certification of knowledge and skills can be tricky in blending formal and informal learning- as is often seen in capstone/project based modules. While the idea of badges and online certificates are relevant, the ground reality is that these may not be recognized. At least from the Asian perspective, I feel that universities are still into accreditation, and this requires certain standard criteria, which may not accept the novel forms of recognition. Also the industries that employ students may not be open to these sort of certification/award recognition, which impacts the graduate employability, which in turn means that universities may not use these types of recognition. This in my view is a bottle neck. The alternative to this situation is probably for academics and support staff to derive relevant assessment measures nacha_sockalingam Sep 30, 2016.I disagree, and believe that industry has more quickly recognized the informal learning and the micro credentialing. Many organizations support both financially and time wise the opportunity for their employees to earn credentials in specialized area. The "industries" have come to expect their staff to have life long learning, to gain certificates in specialized areas, and in some cases have had to create their own certification programs. Higher Education has been against it because leaders and faculty have said that learning can only be recognized by a degree from a higher education institution. Now the community including departments of education have thrown down the gauntlet to the leaders and faculty and said make this work, accept that there is informal learning. The ACPE accrediting body for pharmacy now requires that co-curricular (informal) learning be monitored, required, and assessed. At this point, no one knows what that means, but its not the first time and it wont be the last. (rneuron Oct 2, 2016)I take your point about traditional teaching methods, but surely they go back way further than that, certainly to the ancient Greeks and, almost certainly back to early man? I am sure hunting 101 was on the curriculum for the ancient cave dwellers, along with majors in fire making and minors in cave painting... Having said that, the adherence to traditional methods, with academics often teaching the way they themselves were taught, means that adoption of new paradigms is limited to those with the bravery to try, and indeed sometimes fail, to do something different in the classroom. The stakes are high - getting it wrong can mean a drop in the student satisfaction ratings and/or results, and all that implies. The constant data. scrutiny added to increasing student numbers and staff workloads means it is always an uphill struggle to move things forwards. damian.mcdonald Sep 22, 2016(rneuron Oct 2, 2016)We have long known (with substantial research in both workplace, K-12/higher ed, and other settings) that more than 75% of applied learning (which may be defined as learning which contributes to some form of value creation) is situated in everyday social interactions (see books by John Seely Brown & Paul Duguid, The Social Life of Information, Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown A New Culture of Learning, and Etienne Wenger & Richard MacDermott, Cultivating Communities of Practice, as well as many former former staff members of the Institute for Research on Learning (IRL):<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institute_for_Research_on_Learning>. The challenges here include first recognizing that it's in the informal sphere where not only most of this learning is taking place, but also, where it's demonstrated in practice. This leads to a major challenge for how colleges and universities can (should?) move toward a more blended model of alignment of helping students develop competencies and skills that can be recognized outside of formal classroom situations, but while also giving them a broader view of how different fields of knowledge emerge, diverge and evolve. A related challenge (also addressed by Thomas and Brown's book, as well as many others) is how to focus on development of multiple kinds of thinking, and how to flexibly be able to shift between and among these (critical, creative, design thinking, as well as both historical and futures thinking).ted Oct 1, 2016 The last sentence about flexibility and kinds of thinking is where our goals should be aimed. Knowledge is no longer the realm of Higher Ed. (rneuron Oct 2, 2016) Creating new knowledge may be, but good old fashioned 2 +2 is found everywhere you look. (rneuron Oct 2, 2016)
    We absolutely need to do more as education community to better link informal and formal learning. I think this is part of the education landscape being "disrupted" and it is important to recognize the role informal learning can play in ideas such as life-long learning and blockchain mayaig Oct 2, 2016
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    Oct 5, 2016tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    This is an area near and dear to my heart and is something I have devoted my entire career to pursuing. In a nutshell, I believe that learning happens constantly. There should be no distinction between formal and informal learning. Yet, society has dictated that learning is a formal activity that must be controlled by governmental mechanisms. That is our culture so we need to accept it or work to change it. I opt to pursue the latter.
    It is often said that we are all born scientists. Infants are constantly experimenting. They put things in their mouth that adults would consider bad. They touch things to explore what they are. They learn to walk because they try something they have no experience with. They learn to speak by mimicking those around them. Babies are not encumbered by the rules we create in our formal educational venues.
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    Facilitating Discovery of Learning Technologies
    In the growing field of adaptive learning, many solutions promise to increase student success. Faculty may be motivated to adopt learning technologies when evidence indicates that students will benefit, but they cannot always find reputable information about technologies’ impact on teaching and learning. Even multiple studies of a single tool can yield varying results due to differences in research conditions such as learner populations and technical implementation support. In response to this challenge, leaders have created resources that compile digital learning technology reviews, efficacy research, and student impact data in searchable formats. While these tools and communities of practice represent first steps to aid institutional decision-makers, technology discovery and selection remain a complex web of considerations including factors such as tool interoperability, affordability, and the pedagogical needs of learners.deone.zell Oct 1, 2016 Sam Oct 3, 2016
    I would add that we have to be cognizant of the old adage the "you can lead a horse to water." Too often we introduce learning technologies as "the latest and greatest thing" without any real analysis of the kinds of needs that faculty perceive in their respective teaching environments. This gives them little incentive to invest fully into any new technology that we bring to the table. This severely undermines the potential stickiness of anything we bring to the table. The Teaching Innovation Lab concept that we are developing at HCC is explicitly designed to be faculty-driven, both with respect with pedagogical innovation as well as technological augmentation. We will give them a menu of possibilities but it's up to the individual faculty member to determine the efficacy of the meal to his or her pedagogical mission. That way they also "own" what they are doing and will be far more passionate in making it work. You can't change people, you can only facilitate them on their journey of changing themselves. tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Financial Aid for Competency-Based Education
    Competency-based education, which allows students to receive credit for and build on real-world skills more efficiently than the conventional semester system, provides a flexible and affordable solution for student success. Current evidence supports claims that these programs increase access to postsecondary credentials at more affordable costs for low-income and minority students. However, institutions are challenged with designing programs that map student progress into traditional credit hour equivalencies so students can qualify for federal financial aid. Organizations such as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Lumina Foundation are investing significant resources to build solutions that create infrastructure and support for this accelerated college completion model. Sam Oct 3, 2016 deone.zell Oct 1, 2016
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    As it takes so long to change in education with need very strong visions of the future skills
    rebeccad Oct 2, 2016Yes, we need to move beyond digital literacy to integration across the curriculum and equipping students to partner with technology to solve problems. See this report from AAC&U: Bass, Randy, and Bret Eynon. “Open and Integrative: Designing Liberal Education for the New Digital Ecosystem.” Association of American Colleges and Universities, June 16, 2016. https://www.aacu.org/publications-research/publications/open-and-integrative-designing-liberal-education-new-digitalWhile technology and digital literacy may be high in general, I feel that there is room for improvement in terms of using technology as meaningful tools to transform teaching and learning. I think that predominant use would be at the level of substitution and modification in the scale of SAMR. The challenge is not about not using technology but the level of usage.. The other observation is that the assumption that millennial students are more technology ready and hence they would use technology for learning could be an overestimation. In my studies with students asking them on their use of technology tools for learning, I learnt that they use limited set of technology tools for learning itself. Yes, they could use technology tools in general in social circle etc, but they do not eem to be conversant in using technology for learning. I suppose that there is a barrier in transfer of skills. It is like being fluent in spoken English, but we may not be that comfortable in academic writing. The same way, students may be comfortable using technology in general but they need not be comfortable in using these tools for learning nacha_sockalingam Sep 30, 2016.Strongly agree, digital literacy of students is easily assumed but no real attention is paid to testing their literacy and improving it. Yet it is essential to using technology effective during education and in the jobs students work in after graduating. M.vanWetering Oct 2, 2016One aspect of digital literacy that used to be split out is information/media literacy; this was first developed by numerous medialiteracy organizations (e.g., Center for Media Literacy <http://medialit.org>) and also the information literaciesdeveloped by the American Library Association (ALA), ACRL and other related library groups(e.g., <http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency>).Well, this poses an interesting question as we need to focus on both improving the "digital literacy" of faculty who can better use digital tools to teach critical thinking and improv4 dgital literacy of students.
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    Oct 5, 2016I think we will have truly succeeded in this effort when can drop the word "digital" (or "information" or "visual") this concept. There are many literacies and students should have at least a passing fluency with all of them. "Digital" just unlocks the doors to a wider range of opportunities than we had in the text-only world prevalent a few decades ago. tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Integrating Student Data Across Platforms
    The growing use of data mining software in online education is fostering learning environments that leverage analytics and visualizations to portray learning data in a multidimensional and portable manner. In online and blended courses, data can reveal how student actions contribute to their progress and specific learning gains. These technologies, enhanced by predictive analytics, have great potential to support student success by identifying and reaching out to struggling students and streamlining the path to graduation. As institutions implement learning management systems, degree planning technologies, early alert systems, and tutor scheduling that promote increased interactions among students, faculty, and advising staff, there is a need for centralized aggregation of these data to provide students with holistic support that improves learning outcomes. This can be a challenge for institutions that are using a variety of technology systems that are not integrated with each other. Further, while colleges and universities are capturing a deluge of student data, often this information sits in divisional and departmental silos, falling short of informing comprehensive decision-making and creating predictive models. Sam Oct 3, 2016 deone.zell Oct 2, 2016We've seen greater adoption of LMS's that are user-friendly, and given that they are a given component of education today, we may see further consolidation given the advantages offered by having numerous institutions on the same platform.deone.zell Oct 1, 2016
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    Our IT department is creating a global learning ecosystem that acknowledges both tools we support and the ones that exist outside of our control. Both students and faculty need to develop resilience in face of technology change. One public description of this ecosystem is here (2nd paragraph):
    https://rebeccafrostdavis.wordpress.com/2015/03/14/liberal-education-in-the-emerging-digital-ecosystem/ At the same time, we are working on internal organizational development to adopt to changes needed in IT.
    Technology is inherently disruptive and this will increasingly apply to the more inflexible parts of IT. We are already seeing systems that fundamentally undermine the systems architecture that exists today in much the same way as the personal computer undermined the mainframe 30 years ago. tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Keeping Formal Education Relevant
    As online learning and free educational content become more pervasive, stakeholders and administrators must seriously consider what schools can provide that cannot be replicated by other sources. It is no longer necessary for parents to send their children to school for them to become knowledgeable and gain skills that will lead them to gainful employment. There are, however, valuable skills and attitudes that can only be acquired in school settings. Soft skills, such as face-to-face communication and collaboration, for instance, are essential practices for solving problems in a world that is increasingly interconnected. Similarly, work ethic and the ability to persevere through even the toughest challenges, both social and academic, are reinforced in formal education environments. The idea is to rethink the value of education as a means of reinforcing attitudes and skills learners will need to seek credible information, work effectively in teams, and persist in achieving their goals. A recent survey by the Workforce Solutions Group found that more than 60% of employers say applicants lack “communication and interpersonal skills.” On the same note, the National Association of Colleges and Employers surveyed more than 200 employers about their top ten priorities in new hires and found that hiring managers desire people who are team players, problem solvers and can plan, organize and prioritize their work while technical skills fell lower on the list. Generally speaking, trends in hiring make it clear that soft skills such as communication and work ethic are differentiating outstanding applicants from the pile. deborah.cooke Sep 11, 2016 gilly.salmon Sep 22, 2016 in my view we need to go well beyond the ideas of soft skills and differentiation for current jobs
    https://www.fastcompany.com/3046277/the-new-rules-of-work/the-top-jobs-in-10-years-might-not-be-what-you-expect, to offer really great futures to our students they need to be prepared for as yet unknown jobs in uncertain futuresThere is so much more to a university education than the acquisition of knowledge. Probably the most useful thing I learned as an undergraduate was who I was, and who I wanted to be. I don't remember ever going to a class to learn that. This is one of the reasons why I feel traditional first degrees are so important, as opposed to distance learning degrees, which often short change students, particularly in the areas of personal and professional development. Whilst we may not know what the jobs of the future will be, surely the ability to work in a team, resilience, self-awareness, communication skills, and a strong work ethic are going to remain at the top of the employer wish lists along with genuine work experience - the good news is that a year in industry can often help to instill or improve all of those things, as well as improve academic performance once the student returns - if only they could be made compulsory across all disciplines... damian.mcdonald Sep 22, 2016I agree to many of Damian's comments; so much of my time as an undergrad (and grad student) at the University of California, Berkeley, was spent not in classrooms, but in taking advantage of all the different kinds of cultural, research, and other institutions that were both on and surrounding the campus--and the greater San Francisco Bay Area. Also, many of my early leadership skills came from student-run organizations that provided value to the community. Doing these contributes a great deal to developing self-knowledge and helping define and refine part of one's passions and life missions. Not sure just how much technology, per se, plays a role here, but in being able to look back now over 40+ years, this is something we often miss in just online classes or various formal orms of personal assessment of interests, skills, and strengths. ted Oct 1, 2016Agreed, but those things will happen as one grows up, unless we do keep our learners in a bubble, and so the campus will be replaced by the community they live and learn.Although how fraternities and sororities will change to ensure they keep attracting members who learn to be leaders will be interesting to watch. Many of the USA top business organizations had fraternity men at the helm at least according to statistics from a few short years ago (rneuron Oct 2, 2016)
    This should be termed keeping "education" relevant. We'll be okay as long as we are flexible about "formal" means. tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Managing Knowledge Obsolescence
    Simply staying organized and current presents a challenge in a world where information, software tools, and devices proliferate at the rate they do today. New developments in technology are exciting and their potential for improving quality of life is enticing, but it can be overwhelming to attempt to keep up with even a few of the many new tools that are released. User-created content is exploding, giving rise to information, ideas, and opinions on all sorts of interesting topics, but following even some of the hundreds of available authorities means sifting through a mountain of information on a weekly or daily basis. There is a greater need than ever for effective tools and filters for finding, interpreting, organizing, and retrieving the data that is important to us. I agree that this will be a major challenge for teachers.kumiko.aoki Sep 20, 2016 I entirely agree.Teachers should cooperate much more intensively with the libraties that have several tools etc. at their disposal. I'm no libraian myself, but for years I have beaten the drum for much more integration of the libraries in the stuides - not as this eternal appendix, but as a partner in its owen right ole Sep 20, 2016This is one of the reasons technology conferences are so valuable. In the U.K. the JISC conferences are especially useful, as the content has been carefully filtered to bring to the forefront only the very best and most useful technological advances available at that particular moment in time, along with top of the line keynotes, and updates on relevant changes on government legislation. damian.mcdonald Sep 22, 2016It seems knowledge obsolescence feeds the issue of keeping formal education relevant (above). Increasingly, we are teaching one another. Increasingly, we are autodidactic. This shifts everyone's role and perception - undermining the role of teachers and formal education. And libraries. That is - it undermines the traditional roles played by teachers, schools, and libraries. It nudges at the status-quo and challenges us to adapt. Those who adapt will fair better than those who stand their ground. This is not something we fight, it is something we embrace. Again, our greatest challenge is our own culture. brad.hinson Sep 29, 2016gilly.salmon Oct 5, 2016 mm yes but I'm a bit over saying ' its culture' - instead lets create future changes...the culture follows ?As I said the Horizon AU In the VET sector primarily because of the length of time that evidence must be kept, it is crucial that organisations consider obsolescence with the storage and retrieval of backups and put in place a digital preservation strategy to ensure that they will still be able to access these records. Also training organisations need to consider technology obsolescence when looking at purchasing or accessing systems for training to ensure longevity.yvette.drager Sep 29, 2016
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    http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/9/the-innovation-pipeline-managing-new-technologiesAgree with above comment on institutions failing to move innovations into the mainstream. In most US campuses support is provided to faculty during the process of development of teaching innovations, however little framework exist on majority of campuses to adopt these on a wider scale. Teaching innovations often become locked withing a course, subject area, a faculty or a department. In most cases campus groups simply do not have the staff and resources to continue development. I see a lot of T & L centers dedicating funds and resources into springing to life a subset of teaching innovations on campuses every year and most die withing several semesters due to lack of support and proper management. To go into mainstream projects need to have a well defined learning objectives and identified results. Most teaching innovations projects lack proper assessment and evaluation techniques and thus it is hard to prove their efficacy and argue for their mainstream adoption. Questions of ownership and intellectual property remain unresolved and are often .poorly articulated in the academy. Departments and groups who are traditionally charged with faculty development such as teaching and learning centers, edTech, instructional support and other groups are already overwhelmed and are simply not set up to lead teaching innovation into mainstream. There is often a tension in these groups in terms of providing professional development around edTech and online learning needs based on existing best practices vs. encouraging and leading teaching innovations. Some institutions resort to partnerships with external vendors and agencies for both professional development and project management support for initiatives with focus on teaching innovations. This approach also works better when the campus does not have adequate internal resources to support emerging tech into the Teaching and Learning environment. These partnerships sometimes work better in terms of leading projects from an idea to the complete product solution. Campuses have to really re-think their priorities, staff, resources to be successful in scaling teaching innovations. mayaig Sep 28, 2016This in my opinion is one of the key issues that hamper the adoption of technologies. It is exceedingly difficult for some reason to really show quantitative data that map to qualitiative data about the value of newer instructional approaches mediated by technology that are scalable across classes and institutions. The author above points out that that robust assessment is the key to marketing the approach and it is difficult to get faculty to invest time if we cannot show them some ROI. They may not ask for things like ROI, but they mean ROI when they ask about why and how to do anything while maintaining their regular work. sunay.palsole Sep 29, 2016There's also an issue about planning for success and to move away from treating everything as a project. nwitt Oct 2, 2016Agree that there is a challenge in scaling innovation. While there are many examples of innovative pedagogy, next goals must be scaling and integrating at institutional scale. Some relevant examples include, Kenyon Essentials Project, https://cip.kenyon.edu/essentials; Virginia Commonwealth University QEP plan on Connected learning, http://sacs.vcu.edu/quality-enhancement-plan/, Digital Learning at Keuka College,
    https://www.keuka.edu/academics/digital-learning rebeccad Oct 2, 2016
    This should be folded in with the larger Innovation discussion. tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Scaling Evidence-Based Methods Across Disciplines
    Evidence-based methods for learning refer to practices that have fostered improved learning outcomes, as demonstrated in controlled trials and pilots. Metrics and analytics that reflect greater student retention and performance across an entire course, program, or institution can illuminate the efficacy and obstacles of specific pedagogical and technological implementations. However, institutions are challenged with scaling their successful practices as the process and evaluation of teaching and learning in one discipline does not always translate to others. Current approaches to scaling effective pedagogies are too often based on anecdotal evidence, when one success story is amplified with the assumption that it can be simply applied in other learning contexts. Compounding this challenge is the notion that scaling is not synonymous with mere duplication: identifying ways to adapt teaching and learning practices for different learners, course levels, program types, and institutional settings requires thorough analysis of the evidence followed by deep thinking around making appropriate modifications for other courses. Additionally, many teaching and learning methods are grounded in habit — educators and institutional leaders may grow complacent as cultivating real change can be a time-consuming, confusing, and expensive process. Sam Oct 3, 2016 gilly.salmon Oct 5, 2016 I think t & L is habitual but also more than that- for many academics/faculty their discipline is thir most powerful culture including how they were inducted into the discipline or profession
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    Very true. It can be an issue internal to a unit (department head transition) or external (dean, president change). bryan.alexander Sep 30, 2016 Higher Education's Organizational Structure The existing structure, whether organizational silos or credit hours, enforces the status quo and stifles innovation, even if the culture is ready to change; so knowledge of change management and conscious application about the diffusion of innovations models may be helpful. [Editor's Note: Combined here with Sustaining Innovation.]
    Teaching Complex Thinking
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    2, 2016) tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Technology-Enabled Learning and Workload of Faculty
    While institutions are willing to promote technology enabled learning through various strategies such as innovation grants, and awards, institutional administrations sometimes fail to see the time needed for conversion of teaching materials and teaching to technology enabled learning- if they are to truly "transform" teaching and learning. Teaching online and teaching using technology, and for that matter student-centered teaching methods are time and resource intensive. In my views, a common factor that impedes the ground ( that is teaching instructors) from embracing technology enabled teaching and learning is the time and workload associated with that. While recognitions such as awards and grants are excellent extrinsic motivators, they do not address the basic need factors- which is time and resource. Institutions need to consider time off for online curriculum development or provision of additional supports gilly.salmon Oct 5, 2016 sort of agree...learning design needs though to be seen as core activities for all academics with a teaching role rather than this being done in 'time off' nacha_sockalingam Sep 30, 2016. MarwinBritto Oct 1, 2016 Agreed. Furthermore, there is little incentive for pre-tenure track faculty to commit the extra time to teach more effectively since there is little reward or incentive to do so. In addition, some who write about these important experiences--in the scholarship of teaching and learning publications--find that these publications may not carry the same weight or rank as high as publications in their disciplines. Promotion/tenure processes need to evolve to reflect changing times and provide incentives to faculty who are willing to improve their teaching and provide scholarship in this regard. Lack of Time, Resources, and Skill A key barrier to adoption and increased use of digital learning resources and pedagogies is simply the fact that faculty do not have the time to learn the new technologies, develop the learning experiences, and learn to implement them. In some cases another key resources besides time is lacking - access to the tools and technologies needed. As mentioned at the end of the first sentence of this entry, learning to use a constant stream of new technologies and new ways to teaching using these technologies, is a major barrier to adoption. If faculty do not have the time or support (administrative support, cultural support, instructional design support, training) to learn to create learning experiences and use the new tools and techniques, they will simply not be used. doug.hearrington Oct 2, 2016 gilly.salmon Oct 5, 2016 teams and priorities are all rather than 'blame time.' [Editor's Note: Lack of Time discussion combined with discussion of Technology-Enabled Learning because of natural overlaps.]
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  3. page Challenges edited ... This is an area near and dear to my heart and is something I have devoted my entire career to …
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    This is an area near and dear to my heart and is something I have devoted my entire career to pursuing. In a nutshell, I believe that learning happens constantly. There should be no distinction between formal and informal learning. Yet, society has dictated that learning is a formal activity that must be controlled by governmental mechanisms. That is our culture so we need to accept it or work to change it. I opt to pursue the latter.
    It is often said that we are all born scientists. Infants are constantly experimenting. They put things in their mouth that adults would consider bad. They touch things to explore what they are. They learn to walk because they try something they have no experience with. They learn to speak by mimicking those around them. Babies are not encumbered by the rules we create in our formal educational venues.
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    a goal.
    Technology

    Technology
    can help
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    or virtual.
    Microcredentials are, in my opinion, no different than participation trophies we give to every member of the team no matter how much or how little the individual contributes. Microcredentials may provide instant gratification for an individual but will not teach the persistence needed for an individual to be successful. Bill Gates and Steven Jobs may not have completed a formal degree program but they did possess a single minded pursuit of a goal that required sustained prolonged effort. That is the true measure of success and one that HE can help to instill by incorporating knowledge achievement wherever it may be found. [Mike Kenney]
    As we go about developing the programmatic framework around the West Houston Institute a thought has struck me that is very much in keeping with Mike Kenney's comment: There is an inherent tension between flexibility and legitimacy that is baked into the higher education system. Many of our "blended" learning solutions are being conceived initially as Continuing Education solutions but these will generally have much less cache than a traditional academic degree. At the same time the Design Thinking, Problem-solving, and entrepreneurial skills are precisely what we're hearing that employers want and what we see time and time again in successful entrepreneurs (including Gates and Jobs). Teaching these skills will require a high degree of flexibility. We are already running into questions about getting these programs properly vetted from state boards and accreditation agencies. If successful, this approach will hopefully create more flexible mechanisms within those agencies conferring legitimacy and I hope make them more flexible. Until that time, we're going to have to be create in how we navigate this challenge. tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Competing Models of Education
    New models of education are bringing unprecedented competition to schools, especially for students whose needs are not being well served by the current system. Charter and online schools have particularly gained traction in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Scandinavia. According to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the US alone with more than 1.9 million students enrolled, compared to over 98,000 public schools where 49.4 million students are enrolled. Most US states also offer and encourage enrollment in online courses, and some states are requiring students complete them in order to graduate. Adding to this challenge is the fact that many students do not formally attend either type of school; the National Center for Education Statistic reports that nearly 3% of the school-age population was home schooled during the 2010-11 school year. Ninety-one percent of the parents of these children cited concern over the environments of tradition and charter schools when asked about their choice. For school leaders and policy makers, the challenge is to meet such competition head on, offering high-quality alternatives to students who need them. As new platforms emerge, there is a growing need to frankly evaluate models and determine how to best support collaboration, interaction, deep learning experiences, and assessment at scale.kevin_ashford_rowe Aug 15, 2016 ole Sep 20, 2016I just did a keynote address for TAFE NSW (College of Training and Further Education, New South Wales, Australia) in many ways our Community College equivalent. This topic had a great resonance with the, in excess of, 300 teachers that were presentkevin_ashford_rowe Sep 17, 2016gilly.salmon Sep 22, 2016 I guess this is about more about competition and new business models between providers than competing models of education viz learning and teaching? ? if about providers- yes, in Australia for example huge interest in public: private, none of it going anywhere much.The province of Ontario created and funded the Ontario Online Learning Consortium (OOLC), a non-for-profit corporation regrouping all publicly funded colleges and universities in Ontario. Then in 2015, within the OOLC, eCampus Ontario was created and funded by the Province: a portal with online credited courses developed by all Ontario universities and colleges, to allow more accessibility and flexibility for students across Ontario. Which means that students can now select online courses from different universities and transfer easily the credits to their degree. This initiative is growing, the Province funding more and more development of online courses and of open source teaching and learning materials in the hope of offering to students more options and more flexibility in their education plan. This changes, of course, the nature of what higher ed programs used to be, allowing students to create combinations of courses for more interdisciplinary degrees, to answer a diversity of needs. This opening and flexibility s a positive direction.agermain Sep 30, 2016 lkoster Sep 30, 2016In higher education, competing models include MOOCs, game-based learning platforms and the inclusion of new roles for artificial intelligence in providing feedback and support for learning. For example, the edX Consortium, with over 100 of the top universities in the world, currently serves over 9 million people worldwide, is creating 'Micromasters' in fields such as educational technology and other topics (e.g. MIT and Curtin University are discussing). These new models of education will allow lower cost delivery and greater flexibilty of advanced degree pathways to very large numbers of people. The larger 'Open edX' platform is on track to serve over 18 million people in China . The Arizona State University free MOOC-based Freshman Year is another example of the disruptive potential of MOOCs.alone. david.c.gibson Aug 9, 2016kumiko.aoki Sep 20, 2016 doug.hearrington Oct 2, 2016 Agree, the students I have informally surveyed regarding awareness of MOOcs tells me that they are still unaware of their existence and possibilitiesbsmith Sep 30, 2016kevin_ashford_rowe Aug 18, 2016 the issue that underlies this, for me anyway...is that of the role and the value of the 'degree' as the credential recognised within the market. Will its increased 'availability' degrade its value in the market? Will the likely disaggregation of it (eg. micro credentials, likely supported by different modes of education) make it a less coherent credential that speaks to a body of achievement? What do we think about this?Good question. So far it seems like a thicker certificate. bryan.alexander Sep 9, 2016 deborah.cooke Sep 11, 2016jantonio Sep 28, 2016 helga Sep 19, 2016 I think Bryan is right. The problem here in Europe right now is that neither the 'market' nor the HE institutions are interested. It's a very open field and the quality assurance is not secured, the argument goes - justly, to a certain degree.ole Sep 20, 2016 I agree - quality must always be at the forefront of our minds. damian.mcdonald Sep 22, 2016 The issue I raise to your thoughts here are that having to watch my child and others struggle through a system to achieve what some would calla quality education, but have the most incompetent and immoral professors makes it hard for me to continue to say that Higher Education in its current model is about quality, or knowledge. I put these thoughts out there more as a devils advocate voice so as we write this Horizons report that it doesn't appear as if we are the "stuffy" higher ed people who only think that one way is right or that we have figured out all the answers in the current model which as you say is thousands of years old. (rneuron Oct 2, 2016)Competing models from the corporate world. LinkedIn just integrated its sprawling social network (how many of us on this board are members, eh?) with its recently acquired Lynda.com curriculum. bryan.alexander Sep 26, 2016Companies like General Assembly and Udacity are offering competitive models for students onsite in cities and online to students across different age and generations groups. Competitively priced they continue to expand their offerings into areas beyond tech topics. Recently they have begun to work with HigherEd and companies to bring courses/programs to campus or the work place.mayaig Sep 28, 2016 (rneuron Oct 2, 2016)
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  4. page Trends edited ... Technology can help. It is a trivial matter to develop expert learning systems that assess the…
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    Technology can help. It is a trivial matter to develop expert learning systems that assess the foundation of knowledge possessed by a student. If HE professionals could agree on the foundation, technologists can build or have built technological tools that demonstrate the strength of the foundation. These tools can also identify those areas where the foundation needs additional development. I would like to see HE require that the foundation be established. Only then can we move the needle from students as consumers to students as creators.
    I realize that this kind of move will, likely, create strata of students. I am ok with that as a fallout from this idea. At the same time, though, I believe that if the foundation is present, each student will rise up the pyramid at their own pace and can achieve the top-most position. Some may do so very quickly, e.g., Mr. Gates and Mr. Jobs, and not need to “hang around” for the full length of time. Others may need more time and more opportunity to achieve the pinnacle. That, too, is ok and should be encouraged. The fortitude needed to create knowledge is the goal. We in HE should do whatever we can to empower each individual to accomplish that goal. And, technology will help. [Mike Kenney]
    We are developing an array of programs around the West Houston Institute designed to help students become creators or, more appropriately, to enhance their creative potential. This extends from a Design Thinking Academy to MakerSpace programs to Fine Arts all working within the same spaces. tom.haymes Oct 31, 2016
    Added to RQ2 New Technology Developments
    Next-Generation LMS
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